Pacific Green Turtle

The Pacific Green Turtle has an ancient ancestry. Its forbears were land creatures, who took to the sea to live some 150 million years ago.

Pacific Green Turtle

This turtle has a black carapace, or shell, which tapers to the rear. The carapace is made up of bony plates. The central plates are six-sided and pretty equal in size both to each other and to the outer plates. The turtle has a rounded head and a slightly hooked beak. Males and females look similar through females are appreciably larger.
They live in the sea, only coming ashore to lay eggs. This occurs from December to June, with February being the most active month. Eggs are usually laid at night and are left in a nest dug by the mother, which, after laying the eggs, she covers with sand. When the hatchlings emerge about 2 months later they have to scramble down to the beach to the sea. At this stage they are vulnerable to attack from gulls and crabs. They spend much of their first 5 years in the ocean and are rarely seen as they spend their time swimming in deep waters. They reach maturity between anything from 20 to 50 years and can live as long as 80 years, growing up to about 84cm in length.